Air travelers ranked Connecticut’s Bradley International Airport last among 21 medium-sized airports in a passenger satisfaction survey.  The airport fell from a second-to-last ranking in a similar analysis done at the end of last year, to the bottom rung of the latest ratings.

Sacramento International Airport ranks highest among medium airports, with a score of 810. Indianapolis International Airport (807) ranks second, and Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (806) ranks third, in the survey by J.D. Power.

Bradley’s score of 742 was an improvement from 724 last year, but did not prevent the drop to the bottom of the category.  Just ahead of Bradley were Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (754) Kahului Airport (758), and San Antonio International Airport (761).  In last year’s survey, Bradley was tied for second-to-last with Kahului; Cleveland finished last.  Both passed Bradley in the latest rankings.  The medium airport average score was 781 in the survey released this month.

Connecticut Airport Authority Executive Director Kevin Dillon told the Hartford Business Journal, “We’re pleased that our score has increased from last year and that our score is the highest among competing airports in the region.”  He added that “we know that there are areas that need to be addressed, such as enhancing our concessions and terminal facilities. We have already introduced a number of new concessions over the last year and have made major updates to our terminal, and we have an ambitious plan for further upgrades over the coming months and years.”

Nationally, overall traveler satisfaction scored a 749 out of 1,000 points, an 18-point increase from last year’s survey.  Among the nation’s largest airports, Orlando International Airport received a score of 778 out of 1,000, beating out the runner up, Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, which received a 767 score.

Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey received the lowest ranking among “Mega” airports, earning a score of 686. LaGuardia Airport, in New York City, ranked worst among “Large” airports, with a score of 654.

The survey ranked airports across the U.S. based on several key factors: accessibility, check-in and baggage check process, security screening, shopping, terminal facilities and baggage claim.

Airports were broken down into three categories based on size. “Mega” airports were defined as those handling more than 32.5 million annual passengers. The “large” category included airports with 10 million to 32.4 million passengers and “medium” airports, including Bradley, are those with between 3 million and 9.9 million passengers.

The J.D. Power analysis indicated that “with nearly every airport in the country dealing with challenges of high passenger capacity and ongoing construction projects to address increased demand, technology is helping to directly address these issues.”

“The trifecta of a steadily improving economy, record passenger volume and billion-dollar renovation projects unfolding in airports across the country has created a challenging environment for customer satisfaction,” added Michael Taylor, Travel Practice Lead at J.D. Power.

Now in its 12th year, the study is based on responses from 34,695 North American travelers who traveled through at least one domestic airport with both departure and arrival experiences (including connecting airports) during the past three months. Travelers evaluated either a departing or arriving airport from their round-trip experience. The study was conducted from January through August 2017.

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    4 Responses to Bradley Ranks Last in Passengers’ Satisfaction Rating of 21 Mid-Sized U.S. Airports

    1. Not in CT says:

      I would think the airport would rank higher since the Exec Director uses it consistently to fly back to CT from Orlando, where he is a Homesteaded FLA resident.

      http://www.ocpafl.org/searches/ParcelSearch.aspx

    2. larry Edwards says:

      Bradley’s 742 rating does not deserve a cynical “last place”.
      The ratings range is too narrow to be of significance. It is just too subjective and dubious to matter. The ease of getting in and out of Bradley means that people are just not hanging around to use the concessions.

      • Andre Libert says:

        The use of concessions is largely determined by type of Airport. Bradley is an origin/destination airport rather than a connecting airport, the latter of which enjoy far greater use of concessions between passenger connections

    3. Andre Libert says:

      On the other hand, and contrary to Kevin Dillon’s pro Airport apologetics, any airport whether large or small, is only as good as the vision it’s top management and Board have for it. A limited vision reaps what it sews!

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